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 Post Posted: Wed Dec 26, 2018 9:40 pm 
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I'm curious about this - does anyone know if there is a "general" distance hogs might travel from their bedding area to feed? I've seen trails before that appeared to be 300 yards or more. I've been told that if you bust their bedding area that they will move to another area entirely. Would appreciate all the info I can get on this - thanks.


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 Post Posted: Fri Dec 28, 2018 8:39 am 
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I'm thinkin' it's just too variable to call on a consistent basis.

They bed where it's thick & safe. Around water during the summer, somewhere else in the cold.

Food is where thay find it. I have noticed that some sounders have a route for feeding, moreso than a place. Around here, it seems to follow cover (escape routes). I see the same bunches in different places and can kinda guess where they are heading. This is with established food sources...they clean up around cattle feeders on their nightly circuit of mayhem.

When the acorns were thick on the ground, I didn't see as many...anywhere.

Boars don't travel with the sows as much, but they kinda run a route too. I often see them show up after a bunch of sows & squealers come through. I don't really have a handle on their bedding habits.

This is the bunch that I watch and keep track of the most. Had them thinned down to 8-10 last fall. Now there are 25-30. Two big sows with a string of sqealers (10lb) in tow and a bunch of the last litter still around.

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 Post Posted: Fri Dec 28, 2018 10:49 am 
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Thanks!


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 Post Posted: Fri Dec 28, 2018 5:11 pm 
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DIAMOND+
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A lot depends on your area. I've seen hogs up in the middle of the morning feeding on prickly pear cactus in the caprock country south of Post, TX. I've seen them bed right next to stock tanks in the panhandle, and get up and munch on food at midday. I've killed several on spot and stalk hunts out there that way.

There's no real hard and fast rule. Like most wild animals, they require food, cover and water. Scout your area to find where they hang out. I've hunted some spots in East Texas where the hogs were bedding in some youpon thickets where there were some mud wallows, and they traveled several hundred yards to their food. Sometimes the food consisted of corn at feeders. Sometimes acorns in an oak flat. Sometimes horse feed at a horse trough feeder. Sometimes they were rooting up green fields. You just have to scout and see what they're currently feeding on, and their travel routes.

As a general rule of thumb, in most of Texas, the hogs will be feeding late in the evening into the night, and possibly early morning before going to a bedding area. Most guys I know have their best luck hunting at night, shortly after nightfall. The hogs are more comfortable, it's usually cooler out, and there's typically less activity on the ranches at night.

With the above being said, hunting pressure will come into play. The ranch I hunt in the panhandle has virtually zero hunting pressure. So, the hogs and other animals are comfortable moving around more in the daylight. While on hunting leases, where there are maybe 10 or more hunters for a 1000acres, the hogs may be more skittish. Their patterns may also be affected by hunting methods. If the rancher allows hog doggers to run the woods at night, it may be tough for the stand hunters to get shots on that particular night. And, bowhunters naturally bother the hogs less.

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Marty

http://www.feederlights.com/
The BEST HOG HUNTING LIGHTS.
http://www.inheatscents.net/
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 Post Posted: Fri Dec 28, 2018 5:27 pm 
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I would add that if you ever get the chance to hunt agriculture fields along a major waterway, you'll be blessed. We've got some prison units that I hunt on which are along major rivers, with agg fields near the river. The hogs bed in the thick cover along the river, and pour into the fields late in the afternoon. I've killed a ton of them in agg fields along river ways. The best times on agg fields is when they plant, or when they harvest. When they plant the hogs will root up the seeds, especially if it's corn that's been planted. And, when they harvest there's always spillage that the hogs will get at. I've also seen them destroy acres and acres of crop right before harvest. They'll simply push down the corn or maize, and destroy it/eat it.

_________________
Happy hunting,
Marty

http://www.feederlights.com/
The BEST HOG HUNTING LIGHTS.
http://www.inheatscents.net/
The BEST HOG HUNTING SCENTS.


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 Post Posted: Fri Dec 28, 2018 6:28 pm 
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If I don't hunt for a week or so, it's like starting from scratch.

If at all possible, I'll try to get out a few hours before dark and try to figure out what they are doing.

Find fresh damage and see where the ranchers have cows moved to, etc.

Interesting deal, one rancher mixes his own feed and uses corn, dried brewers grain, silage and molasses. His pastures are usually hit the worst. They don't just work around the feeders, pastures get rooted all to DO NOT USE THAT WORD and the ones across the fence aren't really bothered. I'm beginning to think that the high octane cow chit tends to grow more worms, bugs & such. Haven't quite figured that one out yet.


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 Post Posted: Sun Dec 30, 2018 8:42 pm 
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Appreciate all the great advice! My terrain is probably very similar to that of East Texas, rolling hills with pine plantations and creek bottoms. From you posts, I gather that there is really no set rules on how they operate, they seem to adapt to whatever surrounding they happen to be in. Here, I hunt the swamp edges this time of year, because rain can flood the swamp and the hogs move to the hills - in summer, not so much rain and they may move closer to the creek where they can wallow. Two different times, while turkey hunting at the break of day, I've had hogs come trotting by me, apparrently had fed quite a ways from the bedding area, and was on their way back to it. Following a trail, of course.


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